Sports Journalism Degree

Charisma, character, and a magnetic voice – all characteristics of a future sports announcer.  Couple this with a sports journalism degree, and you’re equipped with the right combination for success. A Sports Journalism Degree opens up many doors for future journalists that have a passion for sports and the desire to be the eyes, ears, and life of the game.

Career opportunities include reporting, editing, directing, hosting and play-by-play announcing for various traditional and new media including print newspapers and magazines, television and radio broadcasts and online newspapers, magazines, radio shows/podcasts or websites.

Sports Journalism Degrees extend beyond simply writing, presenting or producing sports-related news. Curriculum also delves into the ethics, business, entertainment and social implications of sports journalism.

Professors and instructors are often seasoned sports journalists themselves and teach based on their own valuable experiences. Most sports journalism degree programs also offer one or more internship opportunities so that you can experience a variety of potential workplaces, find out which you are most interested in and potentially secure employment for right after graduation. Check out the list of our campus and online schools to find a program that suits your needs and career goals.

Bachelors Degree in Sports Journalism

Howard Cosell - Famous Sports Announcer did not earn a sports journalism degree, but first thought of studying law

Howard Cosell

Depending on which university or college you attend, you may have the option of pursuing a Bachelors degree with a Sports Journalism Major, minor or concentration. In some cases, specializations may be called “Sports Communications” as part of a Journalism undergraduate degree. Courses generally include Introduction to the Sports Industry, Sports Media, Sports Reporting and Writing, Broadcasting, Producing and Hosting Sports Shows, Sports Information Offices, Technical Journalism Skills, Play-by-Play and Announcing and other similar classes. Other required courses may include Advertising, Public Relations, Kinesiology and other classes related to the Sports Industry. Internships are often a requirement for successful completion of a Bachelor Sports Journalism Degree.

Masters Degree in Sports Journalism

You also have the option of pursuing a Sports Journalism Degree at the Masters level, if you already have an undergraduate degree and wish to advance your career. At the graduate level, you can become more specialized in areas of research, business, public affairs or other relevant disciplines as they directly relate to the Sports Industry. Often a two-year program, you will have the opportunity to directly study and experience the various media of sports journalism and learn how they directly impact your evolving career and society as a whole.

Online Sports Journalism Degrees

Several of the journalism schools listed on our site offer Online Sports Journalism Degrees. Some offer a certain number of courses online, whereas others can be completed fully on a computer from the comfort of your own home or office. If you wish to complete a Sports Journalism Degree at your own pace, without disrupting your daily lifestyle and commitments, than an online program is the way to go. Check out the list of journalism schools to see which ones offer full online degrees, some courses or even certificate programs.

Sports Journalism Internships

One valuable component of most Sports Journalism Degree programs is the opportunity to complete one or more Internships, which often count towards credit hours. Not only do you receive valuable on-the-job training; Sports journalism internships can lead to employment with that same company or media group after graduation.

Some examples of places to do an Internship include:

  • University or local newspapers and magazines
  • National and international sports magazines, such as ESPN or Sports Illustrated
  • Sports and Entertainment firms
  • Professional sports teams
  • Professional sports venues
  • Local or national radio broadcasters
  • Local or national television stations
  • Sports websites, such as MLB.com, Pro Player Video or ESPN
  • University athletics associations